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Cuentas Inc. [CUEN]

Exchange: PNK Industry: Telecom Services

Cuentas Inc. Price, Forecast, Insider, Ratings, Fundamentals & Signals

Cuentas Inc. is listed at the  Exchange

-4.59% $0.322

America/New_York / 1 mar 2024 @ 15:30



Cuentas Inc. Fundamentals

Financial Score: Method 1: -18.32 | Method 2: 2.00

Last Quarter Results: 30 sep 2023 (Q3) | Last Annual Results: 31 des 2022 (FY) | Reporting Currency: USD

Next Earnings Update:
PE:
Short Summary Q3-2023
Revenue $895 000K 2 137.50%
Cost $2.08M 43.39%
Net Income $-1.19M 15.93%
EPS $-0.530 20.90%
Last Financial Statement ( Q3-2023 )

Q3: Revenues for Cuentas Inc. grew 2 137.50% last quarter to $895 000 thousand.
Report updated: 2024-03-03 @ 22:44

The Q3 earnings report for Cuentas Inc. was released 22 weeks and 1 day ago on Saturday 30'th Sep 2023. The company posted a revenue of $895 000 thousand, up 2 137.50% from the Q2's revenue of $40 000 thousand. The company spent $971 000 thousand on production of it's products and the gross revenue ended at $-76 000 thousand with an profit margin of -8.49%. The production cost grew by 534.64 % in the period, while the gross profit was unchanged by 0.00% in the period. The result after financial and other costs ended at $-1.19 million giving a negative profit margin of -132.63% and a loss per share (EPS) of $-0.530.

Income

The company has a short history of revenues. Since becoming public available for trading (IPO) in 1969 the company has only posted 4 years of revenue.

Financial Numbers

Q3 - 2023Q2 - 2023Q1 - 2023Q4 - 2022
Income Statement
Revenue$895 000K$40 000K$64 000K$787 000K
Gross Profit$-76 000K$-113 000K$-59 000K$181 000K
EPS$-0.53$-0.67$-1.00$-6.65
Ebit$-1.19M$-1.40M$-1.69M$-5.43M
Ebitda$-1.17M$-888 000K$-1.68M$-1.25M
Balance Sheet
Cash, Cash Equivalent etc$1.06M$271 000K$3.33M$466 000K
Total Assets$5.28M$3.73M$5.19M$1.50M
Total Debt$207 000K$204 000K$201 000K$109 000K
Net Debt$-850 000K$-67 000K$-3.13M$-357 000K
Total Liabilities$3.28M$2.26M$2.31M$2.22M
Stockholders Equity$2.00M$1.47M$2.88M$-724 000K
Cash Flow
Free Cash Flow$-923 000K$-900 000K$-1.45M$-1.61M
Operating Cash Flow$-848 000K$-900 000K$-1.45M$-1.61M
Investing Cash Flow$-75 000K$0.00B$0.00B$0.00B
Financing Cash Flow$0.00B$0.00B$0.00B$3.00M

Analyst ratings & Financial Score

Trailing Ratio Values

Price To Ratios:
Ratio Value Evaluation
priceToBookRatioTTM0.36
priceToSalesRatioTTM0.49
priceToFreeCashFlowsRatioTTM-0.18
priceToOperatingCashFlowsRatioTTM-0.15
priceEarningsToGrowthRatioTTM0.00
Commoh Ratios:
Ratio Value Evaluation
dividendYielPercentageTTM0
peRatioTTM-0.05
pegRatioTTM0.00
payoutRatioTTM0.00
currentRatioTTM0.66
quickRatioTTM0.63
ROI Ratios:
Ratio Value Evaluation
effectiveTaxRateTTM-0.39
returnOnAssetsTTM-2.55
returnOnEquityTTM-9.57
returnOnCapitalEmployedTTM-2.63
netIncomePerEBTTTM1.39
ebitPerRevenueTTM-3.08
Cash Ratios:
Ratio Value Evaluation
cashRatioTTM0.33
cashPerShareTTM0.47
priceCashFlowRatioTTM-0.15
daysOfSalesOutstandingTTM194.97
daysOfInventoryOutstandingTTM0.00
operatingCycleTTM194.97
daysOfPayablesOutstandingTTM278.13
cashConversionCycleTTM-83.17
Profit Ratios:
Ratio Value Evaluation
grossProfitMarginTTM-0.04
operatingProfitMarginTTM-3.08
pretaxProfitMarginTTM-5.43
netProfitMarginTTM-7.54
Debt Ratios:
Ratio Value Evaluation
debtRatioTTM0.04
debtEquityRatioTTM0.10
longTermDebtToCapitalizationTTM0.04
totalDebtToCapitalizationTTM0.09
interestCoverageTTM-1.48
cashFlowToDebtRatioTTM-23.26
dividendYieldPercentageTTM

A company's dividend yield is its annual dividend payout, expressed as a percentage of the current share price. For example, if Company ABC pays an annual dividend of $0.50 per share and the current share price is $10, then ABC's dividend yield is 5%.

Many investors look at a company's dividend yield as a signal of how attractive that company is as an investment. The theory goes that if a company is paying out a high percentage of its earnings in dividends, then it's likely not reinvesting enough money back into the business to fuel future growth. This could lead to slower growth or even declines in the stock price over time.


peRatioTTM

peRatioTTM is a technical analysis tool that calculates the price to earnings ratio by taking the price of a security and dividing it by the earnings per share for the past 12 months.

The price to earnings ratio is a measure of how much investors are willing to pay for each dollar of earnings. A high ratio means that investors are expecting higher future profits, while a low ratio suggests that the company may be undervalued.

The price to earnings ratio can be used to compare different companies within an industry or to compare companies across industries. It can also be used as a tool for forecasting how a company's stock might perform in the future.


pegRatioTTM

The PEG ratio is a company's Price/Earnings ratio divided by its earnings growth rate over a period of time (typically the next 1-3 years). The PEG ratio adjusts the traditional P/E ratio by taking into account the growth rate in earnings per share that are expected in the future.

Answer: A good peg ratio for stocks is around 1:1. This means that for every $1 you have invested in a stock, you should expect to get roughly $1 back in dividends and capital gains.

Some people prefer to use a 2:1 or 3:1 peg ratio instead, but I find that it's usually a bit too aggressive for most people. Remember, the higher the peg ratio, the more volatile your stock portfolio will be. So if you're not comfortable with big swings in your account balance, then stick with a 1:1 peg ratio.


payoutRatioTTM

payoutRatioTTM is the ratio of a company's annual dividend payments to its earnings per share (EPS) over the trailing twelve months.

This metric is used to measure how much profit a company is returning to its shareholders in the form of dividends. payoutRatioTTM can be used to compare companies within an industry or to track changes in a company's dividend policy over time.

The payout ratio is the percentage of a company's earnings that is paid out as dividends to shareholders. A high payout ratio means that the company is paying out most of its earnings to shareholders, while a low payout ratio means that the company is retaining more of its earnings to reinvest in the business or pay down debt.

A good payout ratio for stocks depends on the investor's goals. For income investors, a high payout ratio may be preferable so they can receive regular dividends payments. However, for growth investors, a low payout ratio may be preferable so the company can reinvest its earnings back into the business to generate future growth.


currentRatioTTM

currentRatio is the ratio of a company's current assets to its current liabilities. It is used as a measure of a company's liquidity and ability to pay short-term debts.

A higher current ratio means that the company has more cash and other liquid assets that it can use to pay its short-term liabilities. This indicates that the company is in a better financial position and is less likely to face liquidity problems.

A lower current ratio, on the other hand, may suggest that the company is struggling financially and may not be able to meet its short-term debt obligations.

A good current ratio is typically 2 or greater. This means that a company has enough short-term assets to cover its short-term liabilities.

A company's current ratio can be used to evaluate its liquidity and overall financial health. A high current ratio generally indicates that a company has strong liquidity and is in a good position to repay its debts as they come due.


quickRatioTTM

quickRatioTTM is a profitability ratio that measures a company's ability to turn its short-term liabilities into cash. The ratio is computed by dividing a company's current assets by its current liabilities.

A high quick RatioTTM suggests that the company is good at converting its liabilities into cash, which indicates that the company is operating efficiently and has a healthy liquidity position. A low quick RatioTTM, on the other hand, could suggest that the company is having trouble meeting its short-term obligations.

A good quick ratio is one that is greater than 1.0. This means that a business has more current assets than current liabilities, which indicates that the company should be able to cover its short-term obligations without difficulty.

Ideally, a business would like to have a quick ratio of 2.0 or higher, as this would indicate that the company has twice as many current assets as current liabilities and would be in a much better position to cover any short-term financial obligations.


cashRatioTTM<

cashRatioTTM = cash and cash equivalents / total liabilities

This ratio measures a company's ability to pay its short-term liabilities with its most liquid assets. A high ratio indicates that the company has a strong liquidity position and is able to meet its short-term obligations. A low ratio, on the other hand, could indicate that the company is experiencing cash flow problems and may have difficulty meeting its obligations in the near future.

A good cash RatioTTM is anything above 1.0, which indicates that a company has more cash than liabilities. This is a very important figure to track because it shows how liquid a company is and whether or not it would be able to pay its debts if they came due.

Ideally, you want to see a company with a high cash RatioTTM because it means the company is in a good financial position and isn't as risky. You can also use this figure to get an idea of how much interest coverage the company has. For example, if a company has $10 million in cash and $1 million in liabilities, its cash RatioTTM would be 10 (10 = $10/$1).


daysOfSalesOutstandingTTM

Days of Sales Outstanding is a calculation used to measure a company's liquidity. It takes the average number of days it takes to collect receivables and divide it by the company's total credit sales over the same period. The result is expressed in terms of days.

D A high number means that it is taking longer for customers to pay their bills, which could be a sign that the company is having trouble attracting new customers or collecting payments from existing ones. It could also be due to financial problems on the part of the customer base, or simply because the company has been slower than usual in turning sales into cash receipts.

There is no one definitive answer to this question. A good daysOfSalesOutstandingTTM ratio could vary depending on the industry, company size, and other factors. However, a good rule of thumb is to aim for a daysOfSalesOutstandingTTM ratio of 30 or below. This means that the company should have cash flow coming in faster than it is going out, which is generally a sign of financial stability.


daysOfInventoryOutstandingTTM

Days of Inventory Outstanding TTM is a metric used to measure a company's liquidity. It is calculated as the average number of days it takes to sell inventory. This metric can be used to compare how quickly a company is selling its inventory to other companies in the same industry.

A high Days of Inventory Outstanding TTM means that it is taking more than average for the company to sell its inventory. This could be a sign that the company is having trouble selling its products or that it has too much inventory on hand. A low Days of Inventory Outstanding TTM means that the company is selling its products quickly and may have less inventory on hand than competitors.

A good daysOfInventoryOutstandingTTM ratio is one that is lower than the average industry ratio. It indicates that a company is able to sell its inventory more quickly than its competitors. This suggests that the company has better customer demand and/or a better supply chain.

Generally, a daysOfInventoryOutstandingTMT ratio below 30 days is considered good. However, it's important to compare the company's ratio to the average industry ratios to get a more accurate picture.


operatingCycleTTM

Operating Cycle TTM (time to maturity) is the average time it takes for a company to turn its operating cash flows into cash from operations. To calculate it, take the total of Cash from Operations and divide it by the sum of Net Income plus Depreciation and Amortization. This calculation gives you the average number of days it takes for a company to generate cash from its normal business operations.

It is important to note that this calculation excludes any one-time or irregular items that may have affected a company's cash flow in a given period. This metric can be used as a measure of liquidity and financial health, as well as assessing a company's ability to pay down debt or finance new investments.

A good operating cycle TTM ratio is one that is below 1. That means your company's accounts receivable (money owed to you) are collected within a year. Anything above 1 indicates that you're taking longer than a year to collect on your sales, and this could be a sign that you're having trouble scaling or growing your business.


daysOfPayablesOutstandingTTM

Days of payables outstanding is the average number of days that a company takes to pay its suppliers. It's an important measure of a company's liquidity, because it shows how quickly the company can pay its bills.

The calculation is: (Accounts payable / Cost of goods sold) x 365. This calculation gives you the average number of days that it took the company to pay its suppliers during the past year.

A good daysOfPayablesOutstandingTTM ratio is anything lower than 30 days. This means that the company has enough cash on hand to pay its bills within 30 days.

A high daysOfPayablesOutstandingTTM ratio could be a sign that the company is struggling to pay its bills on time. It could also be a sign that the company is not collecting money from its customers quickly enough. Either way, it's not a good sign and could indicate financial trouble for the company.


cashConversionCycleTTM

netIncomePerEBTTTM is a measure of how much income a company generates per employee. It takes into account all sources of income, including salaries, bonuses, commissions, dividends, and other forms of income.

This metric is useful for comparing companies with different numbers of employees, as well as for measuring the efficiency of a company's operations. A higher netIncomePerEBTTTM indicates that a company is generating more income per employee, which suggests that it is doing a good job of maximizing its resources.


grossProfitMarginTTM

Gross profit margin measures a company's ability to turn revenue into profit. The gross profit margin is calculated by dividing the company's gross profit by its net sales. Gross profit is the difference between a company's total revenue and the cost of goods sold. Net sales is total revenue minus returns, discounts, and allowances.

A good gross profit margin ttm is generally considered to be anything above 25%. This means that for every dollar of sales, your company is making at least $0.25 in gross profit. Anything below 25% may be a sign that your company is struggling to maintain healthy margins and could be in danger of becoming unprofitable.

There are a number of factors that can affect a company's gross profit margin, including the cost of goods sold, the selling price of products, and overhead costs. So it's important to track these numbers regularly and compare them to industry averages to get a sense for how your company is performing. If you notice that your margins are slipping, there may be areas where you can cut costs or increase


operatingProfitMarginTTM

Operating Profit Margin TTM is calculated as Operating Income divided by Revenue. It measures how much profit a company makes from its operations, relative to its revenue. A higher margin suggests that the company is more efficient at generating profits from its sales. Generally, a margin of 30% or more is considered good.

For example, if a company has $1 million in revenue and $300,000 in operating income, its operating profit margin would be 30%. This means that for every dollar of revenue the company generates, it makes $0.30 in profit.

A good operating ProfitMarginTTM is anything above 20%. This indicates that a company is making healthy profits from its core operations. A high ProfitMarginTTM can be a sign of a strong and healthy business. However, it's important to note that this ratio can be misleading if a company has significant non-core operations (e.g. investments, real estate, etc.). In these cases, it's better to look at the company's Return on Investment (ROI) instead.


pretaxProfitMarginTTM

Pretax Profit Margin TTM is the ratio of a company's pretax profit to its total revenue. It measures how efficiently a company converts revenue into profits. The higher the margin, the more profitable the company is.

A good pretax profit margin TTM is typically around 10%. This means that the company makes a profit of 10 cents on every dollar of sales. However, there is no one right answer to this question since it depends on the industry and other factors.

For example, a company that sells luxury cars will likely have a higher pretax profit margin than a company that sells low-cost, disposable products. This is because the cost of goods sold for a luxury car company is much higher than for a disposable product company. As such, the luxury car company can afford to charge more for its products and still make a healthy profit.


netProfitMarginTTM

Net profit margin is the percentage of a company's revenue that is left after accounting for the cost of goods sold and expenses. It measures how efficiently a company is using its resources to generate profits.

A good net profit margin TTM is anything above 10%. This indicates that the company is making a healthy profit and is doing well overall. Some industries, like technology or pharmaceuticals, have much higher margins of 30% or more. But for most companies, a margin of 10% or more would be considered strong.


effectiveTaxRateTTM

The effective tax rate is the average tax rate that a company pays on its income. To calculate it, you would take the total amount of taxes paid and divide it by the company's taxable income.

There are a few factors that can affect a company's effective tax rate, including the type of business it is in, where it is located, and the state of its finances. Generally speaking, companies in high-tax countries will have a higher effective tax rate than companies in low-tax countries. And companies that are doing well financially will typically have a lower effective tax rate than companies that are struggling.

A high effective tax rate TTM is typically considered to be anything above 30%. That said, there are a variety of factors that go into calculating an business effective tax rate.


returnOnAssetsTTM

Return on assets (ROA) is a simple financial ratio that measures a company's profitability by dividing income generated from its operations by the total assets it has on its balance sheet.

ROA can be decomposed into two parts: (1) the "operating" or "business" profit margin and (2) the "asset management" or "turnover" rate. The operating profit margin reflects how efficiently a company is using its revenues to generate profits. The asset turnover rate reflects how well a company is managing its assets—i.e., generating sales from its existing asset base.

Both of these ratios are important for investors because they provide insights into how efficient and effective a company is with respect to its

A good return on assets TTM is anything above 2%. However, you should always compare this number to the industry average and to the company's own historical performance to get a more accurate idea of how well it is performing.


returnOnEquityTTM

Return on equity (ROE) is a profitability ratio that measures the amount of net income returned as a percentage of shareholders' equity. ROE is calculated by dividing net income by shareholders' equity.

The higher the ROE, the more profitable the company is relative to its total shareholder equity. A return on equity of 10% would mean that a company earned $1 for every $10 of shareholder equity. Generally, the higher the ROE, the better, as it indicates that the company is using its shareholders' money efficiently.

A good return on equity TTM is anything above 15 percent. Anything below that could be cause for concern, as it may suggest that the company is not being efficient with its shareholders' money.


returnOnCapitalEmployedTTM

Return on capital employed (ROCE) is a profitability ratio that measures how effectively a company uses the money invested in its operations.

The return on capital employed ratio is calculated by dividing net income by the average capital employed. Capital employed is simply total assets minus current liabilities.

This ratio can be used to compare the profitability of companies in different industries and to track changes in a company's profitability over time.

It depends on the industry. Generally, a good return on capital employed (ROCE) is anything above 12%. However, there are variations across industries. For example, tech companies typically have a much higher ROCE than restaurants or retail stores. So it's important to compare apples to apples when considering what constitutes a "good" ROCE.


netIncomePerEBTTTM

netIncomePerEBTTTM is a metric that measures how much income a company generates per employee. It's calculated by dividing net income by the number of employees. This metric can be used to compare companies or industries and to measure the efficiency of a company's operations.

God ratio is typically around $.50 - $.70 per every dollar of EBT benefits. This means that for every $100 in benefits a person receives, they can expect to have about $50 - $70 in net income.


ebitPerRevenueTTM

ebitPerRevenueTTM is short for earnings before interest and taxes (EBIT) divided by revenue total over the trailing twelve months. This metric gives investors a sense of how profitable a company is on a per-dollar basis. It can be helpful to compare it to other companies in the same industry. A higher ratio means the company is more profitable.

A good rule of thumb is that a good ebit/revenue ratio is usually somewhere between 3 and 5%. So if a company has an ebit/revenue ratio of 10%, that might be considered high. Or if a company has an ebit/revenue ratio of 1%, that might be considered low. There are obviously exceptions to this rule, but it's a good starting point for evaluating a company's profitability.


DebtRatioTTM

DebtRatioTTM is the ratio of a company's total debt over its total assets. This metric is used to measure a company's leverage and financial risk. A higher debt ratio means that the company is more leveraged and therefore more risky. This may be due to higher interest payments on the debt, which could limit the company's ability to grow or make profits.

Generally, a debt ratio below 50% is considered healthy, although there is no one definitive answer to this question.


DebtRatioTTM

Debt-to-equity ratio is a financial ratio that measures the percentage of a company's assets that are financed with debt. It is calculated by dividing a company's total liabilities by its total shareholders' equity. A high debt-to-equity ratio means that a company is more leveraged and therefore poses a greater risk to creditors. Conversely, a low debt-to-equity ratio means that the company is less leveraged and is seen as being safer in the eyes of creditors.

Generally speaking, you want to see a low debt-to-equity ratio, as it means the company is generating healthy profits and doesn't have to rely on debt to grow. A high debt-to-equity ratio suggests that the company might be struggling financially or could be in danger of defaulting on its loans.


longTermDebtToCapitalizationTTM

Long-term debt to capitalization is a metric that investors use to measure a company's debt level. This ratio takes a company's total liabilities and divides it by the sum of its total liabilities and shareholders' equity. In other words, this ratio measures how much of a company's capital structure is made up of long-term debt.

A high long-term debt to capitalization ratio can be a sign that a company is having trouble meeting its financial obligations or that it is in danger of defaulting on its debt. It can also be an indication that the company is borrowing money at high interest rates, which could lead to decreased profitability in the future.

A good long-term debt to capitalization TTM ratio is one that is below 50%. This indicates that a company is not taking on too much debt and is using less of its equity (capital) to fund its operations. A high ratio could be a sign that the company is struggling financially and may be unable to repay its debts.


totalDebtToCapitalizationTTM

Total debt to capitalization (also known as debt to total assets) is a measure of a company's financial leverage. This ratio compares a company's total liabilities to its total shareholders' equity.

Total debt to capitalization = (total liabilities - cash and cash equivalents) / (total shareholders' equity + total liabilities)


interestCoverageTTM

InterestcoverageTTM is a measure of a company's ability to meet its debt obligations. It is calculated by dividing the company's earnings before interest and taxes (EBIT) by the amount of its interest payments in the past 12 months. This number shows how many times a company's earnings cover its annual interest expense.

A good interest coverage ratio is one that is greater than 5. This means that the company's earnings before interest and taxes (EBIT) are 5 times greater than its annual interest expenses.


cashFlowToDebtRatioTTM

cashFlowToDebtRatio is a measure of a company's ability to pay its debts over the next 12 months. It is calculated by dividing a company's operating cash flow by its total debt.

A good cashFlowToDebtRatio would be anything above 1.0. This means that you have more than one dollar of cash flow for every dollar of debt. This is a very healthy ratio and indicates that you are in a good financial position.

If your cashFlowToDebtRatio falls below 1.0, it means that you have less than one dollar of cash flow for every dollar of debt. This is not a good sign, and it may indicate that you are in danger of defaulting on your debt payments. It's important to take steps to improve your ratio if it falls below 1.0, such as by paying down your debt or increasing your cash flow.


priceToBookRatioTTM

price-to-book ratio is a common financial metric used to compare a company's stock price to the book value of its assets. The price-to-book ratio is calculated by dividing the market capitalization of a company by its book value.

The higher the P/B ratio, the more investors are willing to pay for each dollar of book value. A high P/B ratio may indicate that a company is overvalued, while a low P/B ratio may indicate that a company is undervalued.


priceToSalesRatioTTM

A price-to-sales ratio (P/S ratio) is a financial metric used to compare a company's stock price to its revenues. It is calculated by dividing the company's stock price by its revenue per share. The P/S ratio can be used to estimate how much investors are paying for each dollar of the company's sales.

A high P/S ratio generally indicates that investors expect higher earnings growth from the company in the future. A low P/S ratio generally indicates that the stock is undervalued or that the company is in financial trouble.

Ideally, you want to see a price-to-sales ratio of less than 1.0, which would indicate that investors are not overpaying for the company's sales. However, keep in mind that some industries have higher price-to-sales ratios than others because they are seen as more desirable or profitable investments. For example, technology companies tend to have higher ratios than pharmaceutical companies. So it's important to compare a company's price-to-sales ratio to those of other companies


priceToFreeCashFlowsRatioTTM

priceToFreeCashFlowsRatioTTM is a ratio that calculates a company's stock price relative to the free cash flow it generates. It is calculated by dividing a company's stock price by its free cash flow per share.

The higher the ratio, the more expensive the stock is relative to the free cash flow it generates. This can be interpreted as meaning that investors are expecting higher growth rates from companies with high ratios or that they believe the company will be more profitable in the future.

A good price-to-free cash flows ratio is anything below 10. This indicates that the company is able to generate more cash than it costs to operate, which is a good sign.


priceToOperatingCashFlowsRatioTTM

Price to Operating Cash Flows Ratio TTM is the ratio of a company's stock price to its operating cash flows. It is used to measure a company's ability to generate cash flow from its operations.

The higher the ratio, the more confident investors are in a company's ability to generate cash flow from its operations. This metric is most useful for comparing companies in the same industry, as it will give you an idea of how much investors are willing to pay for each dollar of operating cash flow.

Generally, a healthy price to operating cash flows ratio is 1 or lower. This ratio shows how much cash a company is generating from its operations relative to its total debt and shareholder's equity. A higher number could indicate that a company is struggling to generate enough cash from its operations to cover its expenses, while a lower number could suggest that the company is making wise investments with its cash flow.


cashPerShareTTM

Cash per share is a company's cash on hand divided by the number of shares outstanding. It measures how much cash each individual share is worth. This can be useful for investors to see if a company is over or underestimating its net cash position. It can also be used to judge a company's liquidity and solvency.

Answer: A good cash Per Share ratio generally falls within the 1.5 to 3 range. This means that for every dollar of cash a company has, it has 1.5 to 3 shares outstanding. Anything above 3 can be seen as a warning sign that the company is not generating enough cash from its operations and may be in danger of running out of funds in the future.


PriceCashFlowRatioTTM

PriceCashFlowRatioTTM is the ratio of a company's price per share to its cash flow from operations per share. This metric is used to measure a company's ability to generate cash flow from its operations.

A high priceCashFlowRatioTTM typically indicates that a company is undervalued, because it is generating more cash than its stock price would indicate. A low priceCashFlowRatioTTM typically indicates that a company is overvalued, because it is not generating enough cash flow from its operations to support its stock price.

A good price CashFlowRatioTTM is 1.0 or less. This means that a company is generating enough cash flow from its operations to cover its debt and other financial obligations. Anything above 1.0 means the company is not generating enough cash flow and could be in trouble financially.


priceEarningsToGrowthRatioTTM

The price-earnings to growth ratio (PEG ratio) is a valuation metric used to determine if a stock is overpriced or underpriced by comparing the price-to-earnings (P/E) ratio of a stock to the earnings growth rate of the company. The ratio is calculated by dividing the P/E ratio by the earnings growth rate.

If a company has a P/E of 20 and is growing its earnings at 10% per year, then its PEG ratio would be 2 (20 ÷ 10 = 2). Generally speaking, any number below 1 indicates that a stock is undervalued, while any number above 1 indicates that a stock is overvalued.

A good priceEarningsToGrowthRatioTTM is about 2 or 3. Anything higher than that might be a sign of a stock being overvalued, and anything lower might be a sign of a stock being undervalued. earnings-per-share (EPS) growth is an important metric to look at when trying to determine if a company is growing or not. A high EPS growth rate usually means that the company is doing well and that its stock might be worth investing in.

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